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John Sweeney, who led an era of transformative change in America’s labor movement, passed away Feb. 1 at the age of 86.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka discusses why America needs a strong labor movement and how the Biden administration is committed to strengthening unions.

This morning, American Federation of Teachers (AFT) President Randi Weingarten delivered an impassioned address calling for a rebirth of our American public schools this fall. She offered a plan for a safe and equitable return to in-person learning that was filled with solid proposals such as offering enriched summer school programs. “I truly believe we have a rare chance to see a renaissance in America.

Anthony Ngo, an AFSCME Local 2620 member, travels a long way to and from work but wouldn’t change it. He works at Valley State Prison in Chowchilla, California, where he provides psychological counseling and group therapy to inmates. “It’s a great job—great pay and benefits, and I love the staff. And my union helps us out a lot,” said Ngo.

The AFL-CIO, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Sindicato Nacional Independiente de Trabajadores de Industrias y de Servicios Movimiento 20/32 (SNITIS) and Public Citizen announced Monday that they have filed the first complaint under the Rapid Response Mechanism of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) against Tridonex, an auto parts factory located in Matamoros in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Billionaire Elon Musk is slated to host Saturday Night Live this weekend, and AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler (IBEW) is calling his infamous labor practices and anti-union tactics anything but funny. “Musk has used his social-media megaphone to spread misinformation about COVID-19, endanger employees’ health and violate their organizing rights.

The PRO Act is about as important a piece of labor legislation as we’ve seen in some time. It holds the potential to open the door for workers and organizers to step up and reverse 40 years of losses for organized labor. The law, whose initials stand for Protecting the Right to Organize, aims to do just that: protect workers from being harassed or fired if they try to organize a union or if they try to help their already existing union become more active in their workplace. This is seen as the number one legislative priority for organized labor.

Before we even find out if Elon Musk can do comedy, we know this: Letting him host “Saturday Night Live” is a joke.

In 2019, 5,333 working people were killed on the job and an estimated 95,000 died from occupational diseases, according to the 30th edition of Death on the Job: The Toll of Neglect report released today. That means every day, on average, 275 U.S. workers die from hazardous working conditions. And this was before the devastating COVID-19 pandemic that has been responsible for far too many worker infections and deaths in our country.

The U.S. Senate should pass the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, five human rights and labor groups said today in releasing a question-and-answer document about the issue. The groups—including Human Rights Watch, the AFL-CIO, Amnesty International USA, the Economic Policy Institute and the National Employment Law Project—called on senators to seize this once-in-a-generation opportunity to tackle rampant economic inequality by empowering workers and building a more just and human rights-based economy.